Wednesday, January 18, 2012

When erratic becomes the norm




More crazy weather.
I wonder where the climate change deniers have been living?

Today we had a very humid 34oC earlier in the day, followed by a hail storm which did little to relieve the heat. Just now though at 1 a.m. we have had what amounts to a tropical thunderstorm.  Here’s what we are supposed to be having at this time of year. It comes from a website entitled   “The facts about Tasmania’s weather http://www.tww.id.au/tas/climate.html).
The data, extracted from the web pages of the Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology, is based on Hobart.
The Tasmanian East Coast is milder, the West Coast wetter and the NW Coast windier.
Yearly Mean Rainfall (mm)
Highest total first

Mean Daily Minimum Temperature °C
Month of July
Coldest city first

Mean Daily Maximum Temperature °C
Month of January
Warmest city first
Cairns
2,007

Canberra
0.0

Alice Springs
35.5
Darwin
1,666

Katoomba
2.5

Darwin
32.4
Southport
1,452

Ballarat
3.3

Cairns
31.5
Katoomba
1,411

Alice Springs
4.1

Perth
29.7
Sydney
1,220

Hobart
4.5

Brisbane
29.4
Brisbane
1,145

Melbourne
5.8

Southport
28.5
Perth
869

Adelaide
7.4

Adelaide
28.5
Ballarat
710

Sydney
8.0

Canberra
28.5
Melbourne
661

Perth
9.0

Sydney
25.8
Canberra
633

Southport
9.2

Melbourne
25.8
Hobart
624

Brisbane
9.5

Ballarat
24.0
Adelaide
555

Cairns
17.0

Katoomba
23.0
Alice Springs
275

Darwin
19.3

Hobart
21.5
Centigrade

Fahrenheit













“Facts
The cool, temperate climate of Australia's island state with its distinctive four seasons, (reminiscent of conditions in central Europe without the severe winters) makes this place ideal for year-round comfortable living and touring. The long summer evenings provide opportunity for extended sight-seeing with darkness coming slowly.
The occasional deep low in the Southern Ocean, usually in springtime, can produce a gale that "blows dogs off chains" (the island is located right in the Roaring Forties after all). During summer, autumn and winter successive days of calm, balmy weather compensate, while no-one has ever complained about the regular afternoon coastal seabreeezes from October through to May.”
Climatologists did say that for sub temperate regions, erratic weather was more likely. What is even more disturbing though is that no one seems to notice any more how crazy our weather has become. Freak storms in Sydney and Melbourne. More cyclones. Even Hobart has had the occasional one. What would have been alarming a few years ago is just no longer news as it’s happening more and more often.
Nor are things looking much better in the Northern hemisphere, not after the heatwave I experienced in Russia last year and I understand that north America is having a rather mild winter right now.
This has already had an impact on global grain supplies and will probably get worse. Locally unseasonable floods ruined potato crops, cabbages and probably the berry harvest - haven't seen too many about this year, not to mention what Cyclone Yasi did to the price of bananas. I suppose we can only expect food prices to continue rising.

That's my lament for today. 
By the way, having once camped put on Mt. Black in July, I always thought Canberra was ten times colder than Tassie in winter. The figures above prove it, at least in terms of past history.

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